Eisenbergs’ U-M Gift Will Help Conquer Depression

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Frances and Kenneth Eisenberg
Frances and Kenneth Eisenberg

A transformative donation of $10.75 million to the University of Michigan Depression Center from U-M alumni Frances and Kenneth Eisenberg and family of Bloomfield Hills will help accelerate development of personalized treatments that are necessary to conquer clinical depression, bipolar disorder and related illnesses.

For more than 15 years, U-M Depression Center researchers have worked collaboratively to make key discoveries and test innovative treatment options for depression and bipolar illnesses, among the world’s most disabling conditions. The Eisenberg gift will enhance those efforts.

The U-M Depression Center was the world’s first comprehensive center established to fight depression and associated stigma on all fronts. It has helped inspire the creation of 32 additional depression centers across the U.S. and Canada, creating an international network to accelerate progress.

The Eisenberg family hopes that their support for work at U-M will further change the paradigm for how depression and bipolar disorder are understood and treated.

“It is time to put our energy and resources into finding solutions for depression,” said Kenneth Eisenberg. “Everyone has been touched by a loved one or friend affected by mental illness. Our family’s goal is to remove the stigma associated with this disease and to provide the necessary financial support to assure that meaningful treatment is accessible.”

He adds, “Together, we must facilitate increased public awareness so that those who suffer from depression will be able to regenerate their identity, their work and their creativity to not only survive, but to thrive in a world that seeks to understand and support their struggle. In collaboration with our team at the University of Michigan Depression Center, we will find solutions.”

Harold A. Maio
Harold A. Maio 11.11.2016

I cannot think of an occasion when it is acceptable, especially for a Jew, to direct the term "stigma". History offers enough instruction on that.