Fauda Review

Lauren Wallenfels

Lauren Wallenfels

For those of you who haven’t seen Fauda yet, you absolutely need to check it out. Fauda, named after the Arabic word for “chaos,” is a political thriller centered around the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The show has recently gotten a lot of attention due to the May release of the second season and announcement that it has already been renewed for a third season, but the hype is well-deserved.

This show is super captivating and its characters come off as very authentic, all while attempting to tackle a difficult topic. While it can be considered controversial — BDSers have asked Netflix to drop the series due to racism — many people still rave about Fauda and are big fans, including me.

Fauda gives an inside look and two-sided story of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. It allows viewers to get a glimpse of what life is like for people on both sides during this ongoing conflict. Each episode shows a fairly non-biased perspective of the conflict so that no matter which group you tend to side, you can agree and sympathize with the enemies perspective as well. Additionally, it shows how the conflict affects a character’s family and the other people around them. Some scenes can be hard to watch since the show centers around a war and all of the pieces that make up a war including death and torture, but it is an overall great series that is beyond captivating to its audience.

Still from Fauda

The story focuses on a few main characters, one of which is Israeli father, husband and ex-IDF soldier Doron, played by Israeli-born actor Lior Raz. He can be described as a family man; however, Doron is wanted by the Palestinians for his work in combat, which often puts his family in danger. Throughout the series, Doron’s main goal is to kill the leader of Hamas, whom he thought he’d already killed during his time in the IDF. Doron gets so preoccupied with his mission that he endangers others along the way, including his family and friends. Like any good tragic character, he never means to put others in harm’s way, but somehow, he always does.

Due to the fact that the show’s dialogue is spoken in Hebrew, you’ll have to pay more attention to the show and rely heavily on subtitles unless you speak the language. You’ll also want to pay more attention so you can catch everything going on in each episode. I suggest watching this show with a group of people so you can work together to catch the minor details that really add to the story.

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If you’re interested in a more complete view of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, I highly recommend this show. It gives a different perspective outside of what is being portrayed in the news alone that takes into account the complexities of the conflict.

You can find Fauda on the Yes Channel and Netflix, although funnily enough, Israel’s Netflix does not yet offer the series.

With all of the great things I’ve experienced watching and heard about this show, I really hope you’ll check it out. There are 12 episodes per season and only two seasons, so it won’t take too long to get through.

If you decide to watch, let me know what you think. And, as always, if you have anything you want me to look out for I’m all ears!

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