Joe Dumars Fieldhouse
Joe Dumars Fieldhouse facility (Brian Siegel)

The large sports and entertainment facility in Shelby Township has been a popular venue for bar and bat mitzvahs, as well as many other events, since it opened 25 years ago.

Like many other businesses in Michigan, Joe Dumars Fieldhouse closed in March to comply with state regulations counteracting the spread of COVID-19. The large sports and entertainment facility in Shelby Township has been a popular venue for bar and bat mitzvahs, as well as many other events, since it opened 25 years ago. The 100,000-square-foot facility offers basketball courts, miniature golf, trampolines, laser tag and bumper cars, and has hosted many basketball, volleyball and roller hockey teams.

But with events limited to a small number of attendees to reduce coronavirus transmission, the days of big indoor parties and sporting events are over for now with an uncertain future.

“There is no clear opening for athletics and activities of that nature. This is the end of a very wonderful chapter,” says Brian Siegel, one of the owners of Joe Dumars Fieldhouse. He also serves as the CEO of the Jewish Community Center. A sale of furniture, equipment and sports memorabilia has been scheduled for Aug. 29-30.

He and his partners, who include Joe Dumars, former NBA star, and Scott Kaufman, former CEO of the Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Detroit, rent the facility on Mound Road. Without a current income stream, ongoing rent payments weren’t sustainable.

West Bloomfield wedding and event planner Andrea Solomon worked on many large bar and bat mitzvah parties held at Joe Dumars Fieldhouse in Shelby Township. “It’s a good facility, really nice,” she said, because it offered games and sports from putt-putt to trampolines, along with catering services and space for dancing.

Another Joe Dumars Fieldhouse, located in Detroit on the site of the former Michigan State Fair, is being used for the City of Detroit’s COVID-19 testing. Siegel explained that the state is their landlord there and that he and his partners are “pleased to provide this space for testing.”

He anticipates reopening this facility for sports in the future. A new Amazon warehouse will be built at the former fair grounds and a transit center is planned as well — both providing potential users of the Fieldhouse athletic facilities.

Siegel is an owner of other entertainment venues including Detroit Axe, which features axe-throwing, at locations in Ferndale and Partridge Creek, although both are temporarily closed because of the coronavirus. A third location is planned for Corktown in Detroit. “We believe in entertainment, in providing energy for people. We are looking forward to future iterations,” he said.

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