Signing of the Abraham Accords at the White House
From left, Bahrain Foreign Minister Abdullatif al-Zayani, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, President Donald Trump and UAE Foreign Minister Abdullah bin Zayed Al Nahyan at the signing of the Abraham Accords at the White House, Sept. 15, 2020. (Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images via JTA)

The JN is preparing a special upcoming “explainer” issue that will dive deeper into what Abraham Accords will mean in a practical sense, both for Israelis and for Jewish Americans.

Amid the nonstop flood of news that has accompanied this election cycle, not to mention our High Holiday coverage and the JN’s own announcement about its future, we’ve barely had time to register one of the biggest stories to come out of Israel in decades. 

It wasn’t so long ago when the mere idea of Israel breaking bread with an Arab nation felt like something out of an alternate-history novel. But now, after negotiations overseen by President Trump and his son-in-law Jared Kushner, with an official ceremony held on the White House lawn, Israel has formal diplomatic agreements with two Gulf states: the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain. More treaties seem likely to follow.

Andrew Lapin
Andrew Lapin

These breakthroughs, collectively referred to as the Abraham Accords, carry tremendous promise, but also a lot of uncertainties and apprehensions. You probably have questions. And we’d like to answer them for you.

So the JN is preparing a special upcoming “explainer” issue that will dive deeper into what these agreements will mean in a practical sense, both for Israelis and for Jewish Americans. We will speak to experts, academics and people who live and work in the region. You can tell us what questions you have about these agreements and how they will work, and we will report them for you. Curious about how this will impact business? Tourism? Military arrangements? The Israeli-Palestinian conflict? Let us know.

Look for that special cover story next month, once the election is over (and note that, because the election will be over, questions should focus on Israel and the region, not on Trump).

I know that coverage of Israel is important to our readers. Even when the local coverage needs of the moment overwhelm our limited reporting capacities and reduced print space, we are always looking for new opportunities to tell stories from the region. 

Tell us what you’d like to know by emailing letters@thejewishnews.com, or message us on Facebook, and we will endeavor to answer as many questions as we can. 

Next year in … Dubai? Manama? Who knows where the world will take us.

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