Leah Berman, Jenna Friedman and Tania Miller held up signs that said ”Honk if you’re registered” and gave away masks at Campus Martius in Detroit.
Leah Berman, Jenna Friedman and Tania Miller held up signs that said ”Honk if you’re registered” and gave away masks at Campus Martius in Detroit. (Hillel of Metro Detroit)

Leah Berman talks about her time and the experiences she learned as a MitzVote Intern through Hillel of Metro Detroit.

Although I had attended a few Hillel of Metro Detroit events, I had not really been involved my freshman and sophomore years on campus.

But with the pandemic, and the continuing unrest in our country, I began to look for ways to make a difference in my community. This summer I told myself that if I wanted to see change, I couldn’t sit back and wait while other groups were fighting for basic human rights.

Through Hillel of Metro Detroit, I became a MitzVote intern. MitzVote is a nonpartisan get-out-the-vote campaign. My job was to reach out to students to inform them about the election, help them get involved and register them to vote.  

We held various events, including hosting Rabbi Saul Berman, who spoke about the Civil Rights Movement and his time in Selma, Ala., during the 1965 march for equality.

We also spearheaded an Interfaith Panel Webinar with Madonna University, U-D Mercy and UM-Dearborn on How to Vote Your Morals — Featuring a Pastor, Nun, Rabbi, Buddhist, Muslim and Humanist.

The event was a great success with 50 students submitting questions upon registration and meeting their peers from campuses around Detroit. 

I want to give a special shout-out to the other interns, Tania Miller and Sarah Timlin, to the MitzVote student committee, and to Sam Appel, our Hillel adviser, and to the Hillel staff. We had the responsibility to do what we wanted with an adviser who was always there to guide us, suggest ideas and keep us on-track during the election process. 

Throughout my experience with MitzVote, I learned the importance of showing people why their voice matters and how the most powerful thing we can do as Americans is to vote. We have the power to decide the fate of our nation.

We may be diverse, but that does not mean we cannot unite. By being active voters, we can work together for a better future.

Now that the election is over, I am excited about the upcoming next steps for our county. It is important that the American people stay optimistic, productive and open-minded.

Leah Berman is a junior at Wayne State University. 

Previous articleThe Well Unveils Final Art Piece from Paint the Torah Event
Next articleASTROLOJEW Horoscopes for Chodesh Kislev 5781 / 2020 ( 17 November – 15 December 2020)