The kit products come in bags made rom recyled materials.
The kit products come in bags made rom recyled materials. (Hazon)

The Bloomfield Hills-based Jewish nonprofit organization, which focuses on environmental awareness, hopes these kits can help build a sustainable, eco-friendly world.

A new Jewish subscription service is offering environmentally conscious kits that can help residents in Metro Detroit go green.

Featuring six different kits to be released throughout the remainder of the year, Hazon Detroit’s latest initiative aims to alleviate barriers people may face in transitioning to more sustainable lifestyles.

The Bloomfield Hills-based Jewish nonprofit organization, which focuses on environmental awareness, hopes these kits can help build a sustainable, eco-friendly world.

“The sustainability starter kits are based on six unique themes,” Hazon Detroit Director Wren Hack says. One kit supports a plant-rich diet, while another helps reduce household waste. “If we can create these kits and get them into people’s homes, we can give people the tools they need to help them make lasting changes.”

Each kit holds supplies that can help people address different goals, like reducing household energy. For that kit, Hack says one item is a vampire power strip that allows items to use less energy when plugged in. Then, in the plant-rich diet kit, subscribers can find vegetable-based recipes created in partnership with Detroit chefs, plus all the ingredients they need for a plant-based diet, like oat milk.

“Our plant-based kit was created to address the industrialization of animals,” Hack says. The kit, she says, can help educate people on this issue, while providing inspiration for easy dietary changes that won’t take much effort.

“We recognize people will make changes where they’re comfortable making changes,” Hack says. “So, we looked at all the things that surround us that we eat every day.”

Hazon Detroit and the national arm of the organization, Brit Hazon, built the kits around different areas that contribute to waste, such as plastic use and paper towel overuse. They assembled items like bamboo toilet paper, reusable and washable flannel cloths, homemade soap and laundry detergent strips to inspire people to make little changes that amount to big gains.

“We’ve got to make change easy because life is hard right now for people,” Hack says. 

Hazon Detroit offers the kits on a sliding scale from $70 to $200 per subscription, which includes all six kits. “We didn’t want to make a price barrier. Those who are able to pay the full price can also make a donation for those who are unable to pay.

“It can’t just be for the privileged,” she says of helping the environment. “We’ve got to be able to make important changes to our lifestyles that aren’t based on what we can or can’t buy.”

Hack says that people who subscribe now can still get the first kit (“Plant-Rich Diet”) delivered to their homes, while the remainder of the kits can be picked up at Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Detroit on future distribution dates. These include a “Reduce Household Waste” kit on May 23, a “Grow/Eat Local” kit on July 11, a “Reduce Food Waste” kit on Aug. 15, a “Reduce Energy Use” kit on Oct. 10 and a “Buy Less Stuff” kit on Nov. 21.

These poducts help reduce household waste and energy use.
These poducts help reduce household waste and energy use. Hazon
Positive Response

So far, Hack says the response has been positive. “People are excited about the kits,” she explains. “Because of the pandemic, people are used to subscriptions. Oftentimes, they’re getting deliveries on a certain schedule.” This worldwide shift to subscription services and home deliveries leads Hack to believe there’s a market for products like the sustainability starter kits, and that their potential is only growing.

Hazon Detroit has also tried to make the kits fun and exciting to receive. The first kit, Hack describes, came in a bag made from recycled Luna Bar wrappers or denim scraps, among other items, that most people would have thrown out. Instead, subscribers can bring these bags back in to refill with the latest kits on future distribution days. Each kit also comes with a treat, like chocolates.

The sustainability starter kits also connect with Jewish tradition, which teaches people to care for their planet in order to preserve the one created. Hack says that the organization includes information in each kit that explains how that particular theme represents different Jewish values.

“We want people to be interested,” Hack says. “It’s just something different in the midst of the pandemic.”

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