David Vinsky
David Vinsky. (St. Louis Cardinals)

David Vinsky was selected by the Cardinals in June 2019 in the 15th round of the Major League Baseball draft after outstanding careers at Farmington Hills Harrison High School and Northwood University.

David Vinsky’s professional baseball career was derailed last season when the minor leagues were shut down because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Vinsky is back on track this season. The 22-year-old outfielder from Northville is playing for the Springfield (Mo.) Cardinals, the St. Louis Cardinals’ affiliate in the Double-A Central league, two levels below the majors.

Vinsky was supposed to start last season on the roster of the Peoria (Ill.) Chiefs, the Cardinals’ affiliate in the low-Class A Midwest League.

He never played in Peoria in what was supposed to be his first full season as a pro. Instead, he jumped right over that level.

Vinsky was hitting just .231 through five games at Springfield, but he had a two-run single in the first inning May 7 that gave Springfield a 4-3 lead over the Wichita Wind Surge in a game Springfield lost 11-7.

Vinsky was selected by the Cardinals in June 2019 in the 15th round of the Major League Baseball draft after outstanding careers at Farmington Hills Harrison High School and Northwood University.

Armed with a $100,000 signing bonus from the Cardinals, Vinsky played in 2019 for the Johnson City (Tenn.) Cardinals in the Rookie Appalachian League and State College (Pa.) Spikes in the short-season Class A New York-Penn League.

He hit a combined .284 in 56 games.

Vinsky was at the St. Louis Cardinals’ spring training facility in Jupiter, Fla., in mid-March last year when COVID-19 halted professional baseball.

“I was at spring training for one day last year,” he said. “They sent us (minor leaguers) home quickly. We didn’t do any baseball activities before we left. I had two plane flights in 24 hours.”

Vinsky played three seasons at Northwood, leaving as the program’s all-time leader in hits (274), batting average (.411), doubles (66), runs (189) and RBI (160).

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