Fiber artist Beth Rosenfeld is surrounded by her beautiful quilts at Franklin’s Art in the Village in 2019. 
Fiber artist Beth Rosenfeld is surrounded by her beautiful quilts at Franklin’s Art in the Village in 2019. 

Beth Rosenfeld has made quilts as gifts for weddings, bar/bat mitzvahs and births and more, as well as T-shirt memory quilts.

For Beth Rosenfeld, quilting is therapy.

“It’s something I can do where I don’t have to think of anything else or everything else,” she says. “It’s a place where all my tension is released.”

Now, that artistic “therapy” has grown into a business — Beth Anne Quilting. She sells her intricate, beautiful quilts at local art fairs. Next up is the Franklin’s Art in the Village on Labor Day, Sept. 6, and Arts & Apples Festival, Sept. 10-12 in Rochester.

Art has been part of Rosenfeld’s life since her grandmother taught her to knit and crochet at age 6. In the seventh grade in Southfield, she learned to sew in home economics class — and her grandmother bought her first sewing machine as a gift, not knowing it would lead her on a path to become a fiber artist.

Rosenfeld studied textile design at the Rhode Island School of Design and at Syracuse University. 

When quilts caught her fancy, she did research to learn their history. Most are made from 100% cotton, as are hers. She says many quilting/sewing stores have closed in recent years, but she’s always on the lookout for fabric locally and while traveling.

Color is her passion — and it’s quite evident in the patterns in her quilts, from small throw quilts to larger hanging art pieces. Her design sense comes through in the bold colors and elaborately sewn quilting stitches that add another texture and dimension to each piece.

Three years ago, she started a full-time job as a dental hygienist. “I did my life backwards,” she says. But working part-time earlier allowed time for her two sons as well as time to teach Sunday school at Congregation B’nai Moshe and Temple Shir Shalom and time for sewing. 

Now, she spends evenings and weekends in her Farmington Hills basement studio, amid colorful fabrics parsed out to the various quilts she works on simultaneously. “I try to sew every day,” she says. 

Although it’s hard to determine the hours that go into each project, she guesstimates a baby quilt might take 8-12 hours, while a large, dramatic hanging piece could take several months.

Rosenfeld enjoys doing large and small pieces, as well as blankets, and she does take commissions. She’s made quilts as gifts for weddings, bar/bat mitzvahs and births and more, as well as T-shirt memory quilts. Her price point ranges from $5 for burp cloths and $14 for receiving blankets to $2,000 for her large display quilts. 

Her husband, Michael, built the wooden display stands for her quilts and helps her set up at each art fair. 

Rosenfeld loves the process of cutting up material and sewing it back together differently — and the possibilities are endless.

“I never do anything twice,” she says. 

To reach Rosenfeld, email her at BethAnneQuilting@gmail.com.