Repurposed sunflowers made from old pool noodles greeted guests.
Repurposed sunflowers made from old pool noodles greeted guests. (The Shul)

On Sunday, Aug. 15, Hazon Detroit welcomed more than 180 cars to the drive-thru Hazon Michigan Jewish Food Festival.

The Hazon Michigan Jewish Food Festival, Hazon’s largest event and Michigan’s largest Jewish event annually, did a pivot for the second year in a row.

Last year, they reinvented the Food Festival during a challenging time and created something new called Food Festival in a Box, which was highly successful. 

This year, Wren Hack, director of Hazon, and Marla Schloss, director of the annual festival, were concerned about safety so they decided to forgo the big traditional event at the Eastern Market and do a drive-thru event.

On Sunday, Aug. 15, Hazon Detroit welcomed more than 180 cars to the drive-thru Hazon Michigan Jewish Food Festival. As cars approached, the first welcoming signs were big sunflowers repurposed from pool noodles — bringing a lot of color to the gates at Marygrove Conservancy in Detroit. 

There were 40 vendors there to greet those who drove by. Each car was given food, samples and important information to help them learn about local growers and sustainability. 

More than 180 cars drove through the event.
More than 180 cars drove through the event. The Shul
LEFT: Marla Schloss, director of the Michigan Jewish Food Festival. RIGHT: Monte at the Topers Pickle Station.
LEFT: Marla Schloss, director of the Michigan Jewish Food Festival. RIGHT: Monte at the Topers Pickle Station. The Shul
Jennifer Teper of Farmington Hills.
Jennifer Teper of Farmington Hills. The Shul
Sherri Gerber Sommers and Savannah Sommers of Farmington Hills.
Sherri Gerber Sommers and Savannah Sommers of Farmington Hills. The Shul
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