James Wolk stars in the new NBC series
James Wolk stars in the new NBC series "Ordinary Joe," which starts Sept. 20 and can be seen at 10 p.m. Mondays. (NBC Universal, Used with permission)

Most recent TV attention was gained through James Wolk’s character portrayals in the HBO series Watchmen, the CBS summer series Zoo and the Amazon streaming series Goliath.

James Wolk envisioned an acting career from the time he went to Warner Middle School and as he moved on to North Farmington High School, both in Farmington Hills. His interest was furthered through earning a bachelor’s degree in 2007 from the University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre & Dance.

Success came after winning television and feature film roles that started with soap opera appearances in As the World Turns and The Guiding Light before moving into leading parts in the series Lone Star, in the TV movie Front of the Class and the feature film You Again.

Most recent TV attention was gained through character portrayals in the HBO series Watchmen, the CBS summer series Zoo and the Amazon streaming series Goliath, but what if life’s twists and turns had placed him along some other career path?

The actor, 36, who grew up with spiritual inspiration from Temple Israel and business experience at the family’s Sundance Shoes in the West Bloomfield location, will have plenty of time to think about that issue as he takes on the leading role in the new NBC series Ordinary Joe, which starts Sept. 20 and can be seen at 10 p.m. Mondays.

In the series, Wolk’s character, Joe Kimbrough, explores parallel lives after making a pivotal choice at the crossroads of his life. The series dramatizes how different every day might look if a major decision is based on love, loyalty or passion.

“We love how Ordinary Joe lets us experience the universal question ‘what if’ through an incredible cast of characters and engaging storylines,” said Lisa Katz, president, Scripted Content, Entertainment and Streaming, at NBCU TV.

Wolk is regularly joined on set by Natalie Martinez (Amy Kindelán), Charlie Barnett (Eric Payne) and Elizabeth Lail (Jenny Banks).

“North Farmington had an incredible theater department run by Dean Cobb, and he was instrumental to my continuing interest,” Wolk told the Jewish News in 2010. “High school was a great time for me because I was doing tons of theater and working as a party emcee for Star Trax [the event production company].”

Previous articleEssay: The Joy of Sukkot
Next articleNew Website Will Share Grand Rapids Holocaust Survivor Testimonies for the First Time
Suzanne Chessler’s writing-editing career has spanned many years, and her articles have been featured in secular and religious publications across the state and around the country. There was a period of time when she maintained three regular columns in three different publications – one appearing weekly to spotlight metro volunteers, another appearing weekly to profile stage enthusiasts in community theater and a third appearing bimonthly to showcase upcoming arts programs. Besides doing general reporting, she has had continuing assignments involving health, monetary subjects and crime. Her award-winning work builds on majors in English-speech and journalism earned at Wayne State University, where instructors also were writers-editors on Detroit’s daily newspapers.