Empty Synagogue
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Grants could help pay for improving heating, ventilation and air-conditioning equipment, and upgrading the lighting, roof, windows and doors.

The Infrastructure Act, signed by President Joe Biden on Nov. 15, includes a section offering direct grants to nonprofit institutions that upgrade their energy efficiency.

Section 40542 appropriates $50 million to pay for grants of up to $200,000 to nonprofits that increase their energy efficiency. 

Steven Ingber
Steven Ingber

Secular and religious organizations, including the Jewish Federations of North America, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, the Association of Art Museums and the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations, actively supported getting this provision enacted into law. 

Commentators noted the advocacy of the Orthodox Union Advocacy Center, the nonpartisan public policy arm of the Orthodox Union.  

Nathan Diament, executive director for public policy, welcomed the legislation: “The creation of the Nonprofit Energy Efficiency Act will help our foundational institutions become more environmentally sound and enable them to expand their offerings through energy cost savings.” 

Steven Ingber, CEO of the Detroit Federation, said, “With keen interest, we’ve been keeping tabs on the Nonprofit Energy Efficiency Act since it makes millions of dollars available to nonprofit organizations to install energy-efficient items that reduce energy or fuel. Preserving our planet by reducing our energy consumption is critical for the future. 

“We have specific team members whose job it is to stay updated on relevant legislation that would strengthen our community, and then provide guidance and grant-writing assistance to agencies that are seeking funding. We’ll continue to do that important work in this instance, too.”

Grants could help pay for improving heating, ventilation and air-conditioning equipment, and upgrading the lighting, roof, windows and doors. 

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