Posts Tagged ‘Bryan Gottlieb’

If You’re Under the Age of 13, Please Hand the Phone to an Adult

Jenna died yesterday. Before you look in the obits for her, know that Jenna was of the amphibious persuasion; she was Joely’s goldfish. She basically lasted nine days and it was the happiest week-and-a-half of her liquid-breathing life, I’m sure. No fish had been more loved –or likely overfed.

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Life, Like Football, Requires Great Defense

In April 2009, I remember hearing the first reports of a potentially virulent strain of influenza called “Swine Flu.” While the outbreak started in rural Mexico, a few isolated cases had already shown up in California and Texas.
By the end of the following month, Swine Flu, also known as H1N1, had swept through all 50 states and the virus’ first fatalities were confirmed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.

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In the Hot Zone with Dr. Nathan Wolfe

Current World Bank estimates put the global population around 6.8 billion humans, so to be named by Time magazine as one of 2011’s top 100 most influential people in the world you have to be doing something interesting. We’re confident you’ll find Dr. Nathan Wolfe fits that bill.
As founder and director of the
Global Viral Forecasting Initiative, a non-governmental organization whose team of scientists has spent more than a decade developing a global system to prevent pandemics, Wolfe is elbow-deep in the “hot zone,” the term made famous by author Richard Preston’s 1994 book of the same name.
In addition to the globetrotting hunt for viruses, Wolfe is the Lorry I. Lokey Visiting Professor in Human Biology at Stanford University, his undergraduate alma mater. He earned his doctorate in immunology and infectious diseases from Harvard in 1998.

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Party Like a Pilgrim

It’s been like a frat house at the Kiddush Club over the last several weeks. What, with the recently concluded holidays and their associated revelry, you’d think we’d want to throttle down for a bit. Hardly!
There’s nothing we’re more grateful for than the chance to make a l’chaim for the Pilgrims and their astute sense of direction. Of course, if you drove your ship onto a rock, we’d drink to that, too.
Americans nowadays have few things that bring us together more than Thanksgiving. Black or yellow, white or brown — it’s all red, white and blue on that Thursday, baby.
So, whether you’re going to be priming the pump all day with football and baked salami, or it’s a wee bit more elegant, we’ve combed through the vault for some thematic drinks to make merry. Some are simple, and others call for some slight effort. Either way, they are KC-tested and drunkard-approved.

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How the PDR Displaced the PDA; or Welcome to Jesusland

Think back to middle school, when you were somewhere between 11 and 13 years old, and your body was first urging you to really reach out and touch someone (beyond AT&T). Accompanying most of those touches was an ever-present reminder from teachers and administrators to please “mind the PDAs.”
Because newly minted teens often have difficulty exercising self-control, it is necessary for adults to give gentle reminders that PDAs, public displays of affection, are not appropriate.
I think it’s high time to institute the “gentle reminder” policy on another matter involving proper public conduct. For the PDA has been usurped by a far more insidious problem in adulthood that has completely infected political discourse — as well as an entire political party — in this country. I call it the “PDR” or public displays of religion.

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Do the Clothes Make the Student

The “dress for success” axiom drives the implementation of student dress codes at schools, both public and private. Taking it a step further, by way of the school uniform, the code requires the wearer to dress smartly and is seen as a proverbial leveler of the playground; no student is outfitted snazzier than his peers.

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