Posts Tagged ‘Hitler’

image from Emory Douglas slide showing Benjamin Netanyahu and Adolf Hitler saying "guilty of genocide” and giving a definition of genocide at the bottom of the artwork as "the deliberate killing of a large group of people, especially those of a particular ethnic group or nation."

Crossing A Line

Artist’s lecture features slide of his work equating Netanyahu with Hitler. Above: Emory Douglas showed this slide of his work during an Oct. 4 Stamps Speaker Series lecture from the U-M School of Art & Design. Credit: Alexa Smith/Facebook Emory Douglas, a California graphic artist and former Minister of Culture for the Black Panther Party, drew the…

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a boy sits at a Holocaust memorial in reflection to represent the reflection that goes on during Tishrei and the goal to never forget the 6 million Jews who died during the Holocaust

Essay: Remember The 6 Million

We are in the holy month of Tishrei. It includes Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur and Sukkot. On Rosh Hashanah, HaShem (God) writes in the Book of Life for the coming year: Who should live? Who should die? Who by fire? Who by water? Who by hunger? Yom Kippur is the holiest holiday on the Jewish…

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Iranian flag. Photo from pixabay. Iran is determined

Essay: Iran’s Bad Year

Kobi Erez Iran is determined to be the leader of the Middle East and it’s working hard to earn this title. The Shi’ite regime has been attempting to create a territorial continuity expanding from Tehran to the Mediterranean Sea, and it’s getting closer to realizing that goal. This is especially true after the nuclear deal…

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Irv and Janice Goldfein, Southfield; Nanci Rands, Bloomfield Hills; Douglas and Margo Woll, West Bloomfield; Lisa and Danny Kurzmann, West Bloomfield; Kenneth Konop, Birmingham; Jordan Weiss, West Bloomfield; David Kurzmann, Royal Oak; Sally and Richard Krugel, Bloomfield Hills. Not pictured: Lisa Molnar, Ann Arbor; Samantha Woll, Detroit. Global Forum

Guest Column: ‘We Made History This Year in Jerusalem!’

That headline declaration is no hyperbole. It was spoken by David Harris on June 12 at Binyenei ha-Umah, the International Convention Center in Jerusalem. David is the extremely effective CEO of the American Jewish Committee (AJC.) He was addressing the more than 2,400 attendees at the AJC Global Forum, held for the first time in…

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Adam and Eve had two sons. They named them Cain, the oldest, and Abel. When the boys grew up, Abel became a shepherd and Cain became a farmer. One day the two sons brought sacrifices (gifts) to the Lord. Cain’s offering was something he had grown. Abel’s was a lamb. The Lord was pleased with Abel’s offering. But he was not pleased with Cain’s. This made Cain very angry. The Lord said to Cain, “Why are you so angry? If you had done the right thing, I would have been pleased with you as well. Sin is trying to get the best of you, be careful!” Cain paid no attention to the warning of the Lord. One day while Cain and Abel were out in the fields, Cain attacked Abel and killed him. The Lord said to Cain, “Where is your bother Abel?” “How should I know?” Cain replied angrily. “Am I my brother’s keeper?” But the Lord said, “Cain, I know you have murdered your brother. Because of that you will not be able to get the ground to grow anything. You will be a homeless wanderer!” Cain cried, “This punishment is too much! I won’t be able to stand it. I have to go away from this land and from you—whoever sees me will kill me!” So the Lord put a mark on Cain so no one would kill him. Then Cain went away and lived in the land of Nod, which means “Wandering.” Thus Cain was punished for his sin. After Cain killed his brother and was sent away, Adam and Eve had many other children.

Weekly Torah Portion – The Ultimate Redemption

Parshat Chukat: Numbers 19:1-22:1; Judges 11:1-33. One of the most profound mysteries of the Bible is the rite of the red heifer, called a chok (statute) because it belongs to the group of Divine decrees that human logic cannot penetrate. We must be mindful of the fact that all other impurities other than a death…

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Detroit Jewish News June 16, 1944 edition put out during World War II

World War II – From the DJN Davidson Digital Archive

Recently, Arthur Horwitz, executive editor/publisher of the JN, told me about a note he received from Eugene Driker, who found an obituary in the Davidson Digital Archives for his cousin, who died during the Anzio invasion of Italy in May 1944. This was a fierce battle. Although he was a child at the time, Driker…

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Passengers aboard the MS St. Louis, May 13, 1939-June 17, 1939. On May 13, 1939, the German transatlantic liner St. Louis sailed from Hamburg, Germany, for Havana, Cuba, carrying 937 passengers, the majority of whom were Jewish. When the St. Louis arrived in Havana, the passengers learned that the landing certificates they had purchased were invalid. After Cuba refused to allow the passengers to land and the United States (and other Western Hemisphere nations) did not offer to take the passengers, the ship returned to Europe. The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee worked with the State Department, ultimately persuading four countries — Great Britain, France, the Netherlands and Belgium — to admit some of the passengers. The remaining 254 were forced to return to Europe and were killed by the Nazis.

Americans and the Holocaust

A new exhibit dispels the myth that most Americans were unaware of the atrocities happening in Europe. Was it simply ignorance that Jews were being murdered en masse? Was it anti-Semitism? Or did the United States’ unwillingness to rescue Europe’s Jews from the Holocaust have more nuanced causes? That’s the question Daniel Greene set out…

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