Posts Tagged ‘WWII’

Still from 1923 productions of Di goldene kale.

The Toast Of Jewish Broadway

Musicologist Dr. Michael Ochs brings the joy of Yiddish operetta to Ann Arbor. Julie Smith Yolles Special to the Jewish News When Michael Ochs was 2 years old, his family left Germany, where he was born, right before the beginning of WWII. They left everything behind and started their lives all over again in New…

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Jewish GI members smile for the camera in World War II photo

GI JEWS: Jewish Americans in World War II

Filmmaker brings documentary to U-M campus. Documentary filmmaker Lisa Ades will be on the University of Michigan campus 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 6, at the U-M Museum of Art Auditorium for a screening of her latest work, GI JEWS: Jewish Americans in World War II. The film, based on Frederick G.L. Huetwell and Professor Deborah…

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Winston Churchill, Franklin Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin sit by an ornate carpet in a checkered frame in a piece by Beverly Neumann called "Gamesmanship"

Proud To Be An American

Artist Beverly Neumann exhibits a series celebrating the ‘greatest generation.’ Whenever Beverly Neumann hears news reports about veterans’ issues on television, she thinks about two cousins lost in World War II. “Way back, there was an Aunt Etta on my father’s side,” she recalls. “My aunt had two sons — one fighting in Germany and…

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Moshe Sharett

Prime Minister Moshe Sharett Is Born

October 15, 1894 Moshe Sharett is born as Moshe Shertok in Kherson, Ukraine. Sharett’s parents were early Zionists, having been involved in the BILU movement in the early 1880’s when they moved to the Land of Israel, but ultimately did not stay. The family would return in 1906 eventually settling in Jaffa. Sharett attended the…

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Rosh hashanah (jewish New Year holiday) concept. Traditional symbols.. Local rabbis share holiday message.

L’Shanah Tovah

The JN invited local rabbis to share a holiday message with the community. Turning & Returning This summer, for the first time in my life, I was arrested. I participated in the Poor People’s Campaign, six weeks of marches in Lansing and across America to bring attention to social and political issues. Thanks to the…

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letters to the editor, mailbox, letter, mail

Letters – July 5, 2018

Welcome, Rabbi Lopatin I thoroughly enjoyed reading the article “Mixed Welcome” (page 10, June 21, 2018, issue). Our Metro Detroit Jewish community is distinguished by its diversity and inclusion. There is practically a place of worship for each and every Jew, and with the addition of Rabbi Asher Lopatin and his wife, Rachel, a real…

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Flag Postbox Post Mailbox Letterbox Mail Mailing. letters on immigration

Letters – Zero-Tolerance Immigration

A Man Named Jack I knew a man named Jack who was born in Germany before the beginning of World War II. He survived the war as part of the Kindertransport, a program that rescued thousands of Jewish children who were brought to England between 1938-1940. Jack’s parents died in the Holocaust. He made his…

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Hollywood Celebrity Jews

Celebrity Jews – At The Movies And Hedy Lamarr

AT THE MOVIES Opening on Friday, June 15, are The Seagull and Tag. The former is an adaptation of Anton Chekhov’s classic 1896 play. A few critics liked the film without reservations but more said the acting was great, but the film didn’t quite work. The setting is the estate of Sorin (Brian Dennehy), a…

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Passengers aboard the MS St. Louis, May 13, 1939-June 17, 1939. On May 13, 1939, the German transatlantic liner St. Louis sailed from Hamburg, Germany, for Havana, Cuba, carrying 937 passengers, the majority of whom were Jewish. When the St. Louis arrived in Havana, the passengers learned that the landing certificates they had purchased were invalid. After Cuba refused to allow the passengers to land and the United States (and other Western Hemisphere nations) did not offer to take the passengers, the ship returned to Europe. The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee worked with the State Department, ultimately persuading four countries — Great Britain, France, the Netherlands and Belgium — to admit some of the passengers. The remaining 254 were forced to return to Europe and were killed by the Nazis.

Americans and the Holocaust

A new exhibit dispels the myth that most Americans were unaware of the atrocities happening in Europe. Was it simply ignorance that Jews were being murdered en masse? Was it anti-Semitism? Or did the United States’ unwillingness to rescue Europe’s Jews from the Holocaust have more nuanced causes? That’s the question Daniel Greene set out…

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Three Generations – Multigenerational Families

[similar id=44949 type=all] [similar id=44670 type=all] [similar id=44082 type=all] WWII And Three Generations In this World War II-era photo (1944) taken in the backyard at 2476 Clements, between Linwood and LaSalle, in the Central High School neighborhood, you can see three generations of the Cook and Teitel families. Jerry Cook of West Bloomfield, who submitted…

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